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    Haunting Reads for Halloween!

    It does not matter the time of year; one of my favorite things is sitting in a comfortable chair with a good spooky book, but reading them in October makes them much more mysterious. Below are five books from my library that you can enjoy during October!

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    Goodbye To A River

    In the Summer of 2013, I was a junior in college when I came across an obituary in the pages of Texas Monthly. A writer named John Graves had passed away. The author of the obituary heralded Mr. Graves as an elder statesman in the Texas literary world, and highlighted Mr. Graves’ book Goodbye to a River, a narrative detailing a canoe trip down the Brazos River, as the work that had put him on the map. The obituary ended as follows: “It’s an introduction long overdue: Mr. Hemingway, meet Mr. Graves.” Because I had recently completed my summer coursework and had a break before Fall classes…

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    Under Kilimanjaro

    This book is an account of Ernest Hemingway's safari with his fourth wife Mary in late 1953 and early 1954. This trip ended abruptly in January 1954 after they had two near-fatal plane crashes in East Africa. While back in Havana, Hemingway wrote his “African Book” and completed it in 1956. He left this manuscript, along with those for A Moveable Feast, Islands in the Stream, and The Garden of Eden, in a safe deposit box in Cuba. Under Kilimanjaro is the last of Hemingway’s manuscripts to be published in its entirety. I enjoyed spending time with Papa while reading his “African Book.” I am about at the end of…

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    Horn of the Hunter

    “The hunter’s horn sounds early for some, later for others. For some unfortunates, poisoned by city sidewalks and sentenced to a cement jungle more horrifying that anything to be found in Tanganyika, the horn of the hunter never winds at all. But deep in the gut of most men is buried the involuntary response to the hunter’s horn, a prickle of the nape hairs, an acceleration of the pulse, an atavistic memory of their forefathers, who killed first with stone, and then with club, and then with spear, and then with bow, and then with gun, and finally with formulae.”– Robert Ruark

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    Six Miles to Charleston

    It was a cold February day in 1820 as Lavinia Fisher stood on the gallows outside the Old City Jail in Charleston, South Carolina, clad in her wedding dress. Lavinia and her husband John had been convicted of murder. A crowd gathered to watch America’s first female serial killer be hanged, but before the beautiful Lavinia dropped to her death, she had one last message for the people below...

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    African Game Trails

    African Game Trails is written by Theodore Roosevelt and is an account of a safari he took with his son Kermit in East Africa starting out in March of 1909 sailing from New York and ending in Khartoum in March of 1910.  The purpose of this expedition was to collect birds, mammals, reptiles, plants, and especially specimens of big game for The National Museum at Washington, the Smithsonian, and the American Museum of Natural History, New York.  The game mounts from this expedition are on display to this day at these museums.  The other members of the main party included Surgeon-Lieut. Col. Edgar A Mearns, U.S.A, retired; Mr. Edmund Heller,…

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    Lords of the Fly

    I enjoyed reading this book.  It is not what I expected at all.  Most of the books and literature I have read on fishing have either been technical or more often reflective essays or stories about the experience in more of a romantic or Zen kind of way...